Blog Commenting Faux Pas, Red Flags, and Best Practices

Mar 30, 2010   //   by Gerald Weber   //   blogging, SEO Blog, Social Media  //  97 Comments

As blog commenting becomes more popular as a form of link building and traffic generation, there is a steady increase of those who are trying to abuse the blog commenting system. But as many comment abusers are starting to learn, with the increase in spam is an increase in systems (such as Akismet) designed to thwart their attempts. So commenting abusers are finding more creative ways to bypass these systems and look more legit.

Commenting Faux Pas

So how do bloggers determine which comments to keep and which ones to trash or mark as spam? Here are some major faux pas and red flags when it comes to commenting.

Ambiguous Comments

“Wow, what a great post. This is my first time to visit here, and I like everything so much that I have subscribed.”

Sounds like a great comment, right? It’s easy, especially for new bloggers or those who are struggling to get comments / subscribers to fall for this type of flattery. But the problem with this comment is that it could go with any post on pretty much any site.

Comments from the Same IP

“Angie | this domain.com | angie@thisdomain.com | 122.44.77.35 | Blah blah blah blah blah…”

“Tera | that domain.com | tera@thatdomain.com | 122.44.77.35 | Blah blah blah blah blah…”

“Tom | other domain.com | tom@otherdomain.com | 122.44.77.35 | Blah blah blah blah blah…”

Many blog systems allow blog owners to view the IP address of their commenters. If several comments come in using different names, different emails, different websites, but the same IP address, this is going to be a huge tipoff that the comments are all spam.

Copied Comments

“Social media is a really nice way to generate traffic. And YouTube is the best (in our opinion) means to do it. Maybe this is because one has to invest some time and efforts in making a video, so one naturally tends to make a video which is REALLY interesting for people. It’s much easier to “tweet” something, so more often than not one “tweets” rather “something about nothing” (at the same time – unfortunatlly!! – spamming the internet).”

“I’m happy to see more and more of my favorite charities on Facebook and even on Twitter sometime. I do whatever I can to help by sharing their FB messages and retweeting their tweets.”

“I have had a facebook for a long time but it was just recently that I began using it again actively. I also created a fan page and as of now is on the building and growing process. I know i have yet more to learn regarding using facebook to its full potential and advantage. It is my first time to hear about facebook insight. Will definitely be giving it a try. Thanks for sharing.”

“Social media is a really nice way to generate traffic. I’m happy to see more and more of my favorite charities on Facebook and even on Twitter sometime. I have had a facebook for a long time but it was just recently that I began using it again actively. Thanks for sharing.”

A new trend in spam commenting is taking bits and pieces of approved comments and sewing them together into a “unique” new comment. If the blog owner is in tune with their reader’s responses, they will get a feeling of deja vu which will tip them off if they have received a copied comment.

Off Topic Comments

“This graph shows exactly what I’ve wanted to know about social media trends and statistics. Thanks for the visual representation.”

This comment would be the exact reaction any blogger would want – assuming that the blog post actually had a graph in it. If the comment is specific to something that is not in the post, then it is a sure fire one to get dumped in the spam bin.

Straight Up Advertising

“If you are interested in getting the most out of Twitter, you should buy my new ebook.”

There is a fine line in some cases of whether a resource being added to the comments is helpful or whether it is just blatant self-promotion and advertising. In most cases, the best way to go is to not include something like this in the comments, no matter how relevant, unless you are certain it is 100% helpful to anyone reading the post.

Fake Emails

“tom@fakedomain.com”

Another fine line in commenting is providing a real email address. Some commenters do not want to put their real email address with their comments simply because they are afraid of getting spammed. But if the blog owner wants to respond to a commenter privately via email and gets a bounceback, they are likely to remove or not approve the comment.

Personal Attacks

“Let me tell you something, you scumbag…”

Most bloggers are not going to stand for personal attacks. Period. It is one thing if the commenter is criticizing the content of the post itself, but it another thing to start name calling or becoming downright abusive to the blog author or another commenter on the site (this particular example was from one commenter about another one). If a commenter needs to express such personally based feelings, they keep this kind of attack in a private platform, such as email.

Commenting Best Practices

How can commenters avoid faux pas and get their comments approved more often? Simply follow the “golden rules” of commenting.

Follow the Rules

If the blog provides a specific comment policy, commenters should take a moment to read through the policy. If there is not a policy, an easy way to see what can and cannot be done is to simply look at approved comments on the site. Are people only using their real name? Does the site use plugins such as KeywordLuv? Are the comments long and thoughtful, or short and concise? Comments that fit the mold are more likely to be approved.

Respond to the Post

Comments should always be in response to the post to which they are added. The only exception to this rule is if they comment is in direct response to another commenter, but even then, the comment should stay relatively on topic.

Provide Value

Along with responding directly to the post, comments should also add value. Great post (besides the ego boost) provides little value. Tell people why it is a great post, and how you benefited from reading it.

Be a Real Person

Commenters should distinguish themselves from bots or spammers by proving to be as real as possible. This includes having a Gravatar so blog owners can put a face to the comment, and also provide a valid email address in case a response is needed. It doesn’t have to be your main address – it can be one you create just for commenting. Just be sure it will not bounceback, and that you check it often in case response is needed.

More Faux Pas and Best Practices

What other commenting faux pas or red flags have you observed? How about additional best practices to follow?

Kristi Hines is an Internet Marketing Specialist with Vertical Measures providing website marketing services. She is also author of Kikolani which focuses on blogging tips and social networking.

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Gerald Weber

I founded Search Engine Marketing Group in December 2005. More recently I co-founded viralcontentbuzz.com. which is the free platform that helps bloggers generate REAL "social buzz" on their best content. Feel free to follow me on Google+

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Comment Policy

  • LoneWolf says:

    I’ve got several blogs and I’ve noticed pretty much all these spam comments on them. At first, the ones that tell me I’m such a great writer are flattering, until I see that the site they’ve linked is for Viagra or something 8=(

    I doubt that I’ve ever marked a legitimate comment as spam since I get so few, but I’m sure that it happens a lot in the blogosphere.

    What really cracks me up is the ones that show up on my cartoon or video posts telling me what a thoughtful post it was and how they’ve never looked at it that way before, etc.
    .-= LoneWolf´s last blog ..Antenna, Antenna, Antenna — Anybody Need an Antenna? =-.

    • Kristi Hines
      Twitter:
      says:

      I “love” the comments that have nothing at all to do with the post. I try to keep an open mind and see if maybe they were referencing an earlier comment, but usually, it’s just not the case. I think some people think the longer the comment, the more likely it will be approved, regardless if it is on track or not.
      .-= Kristi Hines´s last blog ..Valuable Commenters vs. Comment Spammers =-.

  • LoneWolf says:

    I’ve got several blogs and I’ve noticed pretty much all these spam comments on them. At first, the ones that tell me I’m such a great writer are flattering, until I see that the site they’ve linked is for Viagra or something 8=(

    I doubt that I’ve ever marked a legitimate comment as spam since I get so few, but I’m sure that it happens a lot in the blogosphere.

    What really cracks me up is the ones that show up on my cartoon or video posts telling me what a thoughtful post it was and how they’ve never looked at it that way before, etc.
    .-= LoneWolf´s last blog ..Antenna, Antenna, Antenna — Anybody Need an Antenna? =-.

    • Kristi Hines
      Twitter:
      says:

      I "love" the comments that have nothing at all to do with the post. I try to keep an open mind and see if maybe they were referencing an earlier comment, but usually, it's just not the case. I think some people think the longer the comment, the more likely it will be approved, regardless if it is on track or not.
      .-= Kristi Hines´s last blog ..Valuable Commenters vs. Comment Spammers =-.

  • JD Rucker says:

    Wow, what a great post. This is my first time to visit here, and I like everything so much that I have subscribed.

    JUST KIDDING – Seriously, this is an excellent post. Nothing bugs me more than seeing I have comments and finding that they’re nothing but spam or worthless dribble. The whole point of commenting in a blog is that conversations pertaining to a particular topic can flow freely. Unlike Twitter and Facebook, blogging offers an open forum where people with ideas longer than a certain character limit can express themselves and make their points known.

    It’s about engagement and discussion. Great post. Too late – I already subscribed.
    .-= JD Rucker´s last blog ..Create a Facebook Page for your Dealership =-.

    • Kristi Hines
      Twitter:
      says:

      I agree. I’m sure it’s especially hard on newer bloggers, because they are so excited just to get comments, only to figure out they are spam. I know that was my experience when I first starting blogging – I remember the first time someone added a comment saying the one above hers was identical to the one posted on some of her articles and on a few other blogs she had visited that day.
      .-= Kristi Hines´s last blog ..Valuable Commenters vs. Comment Spammers =-.

  • JD Rucker says:

    Wow, what a great post. This is my first time to visit here, and I like everything so much that I have subscribed.

    JUST KIDDING – Seriously, this is an excellent post. Nothing bugs me more than seeing I have comments and finding that they're nothing but spam or worthless dribble. The whole point of commenting in a blog is that conversations pertaining to a particular topic can flow freely. Unlike Twitter and Facebook, blogging offers an open forum where people with ideas longer than a certain character limit can express themselves and make their points known.

    It's about engagement and discussion. Great post. Too late – I already subscribed.
    .-= JD Rucker´s last blog ..Create a Facebook Page for your Dealership =-.

    • Kristi Hines
      Twitter:
      says:

      I agree. I'm sure it's especially hard on newer bloggers, because they are so excited just to get comments, only to figure out they are spam. I know that was my experience when I first starting blogging – I remember the first time someone added a comment saying the one above hers was identical to the one posted on some of her articles and on a few other blogs she had visited that day.
      .-= Kristi Hines´s last blog ..Valuable Commenters vs. Comment Spammers =-.

  • Gerald Weber
    Twitter:
    says:

    Kristi,

    Thanks for taking the time to put together this guest post.

    Fortunately between Akismet and spam free, not much spam makes it into my comments. However every once in awhile I’ll get an “ambiguous comment” or some other spammy comment and I simply moderate these, so when they do occasionally make it through they don’t last very long.

    The trolls to me are the most annoying but also the easiest to deal with. When someone resorts to name calling or personal attacks I simply delete these comments and usually follow up with a statement that personal attacks and name calling will not be tolerated.

    I suppose a comment policy would also be a good idea. Something I’ve been meaning to implement actually.

    • Kristi Hines
      Twitter:
      says:

      Thanks for inviting me to be a guest author!

      I like the Akismet blocks spam, but my only problem is that it sometimes puts good commenters in the spam folder, and I forget to check it often, so they end up emailing me wondering why I never approved them. It is still more worth it, especially since it blocks the trackback spam which is what I had the biggest problem with.

      Comment policies are definitely good. If nothing else, it gives you something to fall on if someone starts arguing about the reason you didn’t approve their comment (something I have run into).
      .-= Kristi Hines´s last blog ..Valuable Commenters vs. Comment Spammers =-.

      • Gerald Weber
        Twitter:
        says:

        I do get the occasional legitimate comment that goes to spam but I’m pretty good at checking that stuff so I generally get it approved quickly.

        In the end Akismet definitely does more good than not.

  • Gerald Weber
    Twitter:
    says:

    Kristi,

    Thanks for taking the time to put together this guest post.

    Fortunately between Akismet and spam free, not much spam makes it into my comments. However every once in awhile I'll get an "ambiguous comment" or some other spammy comment and I simply moderate these, so when they do occasionally make it through they don't last very long.

    The trolls to me are the most annoying but also the easiest to deal with. When someone resorts to name calling or personal attacks I simply delete these comments and usually follow up with a statement that personal attacks and name calling will not be tolerated.

    I suppose a comment policy would also be a good idea. Something I've been meaning to implement actually.

    • Kristi Hines
      Twitter:
      says:

      Thanks for inviting me to be a guest author!

      I like the Akismet blocks spam, but my only problem is that it sometimes puts good commenters in the spam folder, and I forget to check it often, so they end up emailing me wondering why I never approved them. It is still more worth it, especially since it blocks the trackback spam which is what I had the biggest problem with.

      Comment policies are definitely good. If nothing else, it gives you something to fall on if someone starts arguing about the reason you didn't approve their comment (something I have run into).
      .-= Kristi Hines´s last blog ..Valuable Commenters vs. Comment Spammers =-.

      • Gerald Weber
        Twitter:
        says:

        I do get the occasional legitimate comment that goes to spam but I'm pretty good at checking that stuff so I generally get it approved quickly.

        In the end Akismet definitely does more good than not.

  • Kristi,

    Great post!

    I have dealt with all of the different kinds of spam comments you describe on my blog. I totally agree with what you said about how it is very hard deleting comments that are just saying “Good job” if your blog is relatively new and struggling for comments.

    I think encouraging comments at the end of your post and replying to people who take the time to leave an insightful comment are ways you will engage more of your readership.
    .-= Mark Thompson´s last blog ..Are Custom Web Designs Being Replaced By WordPress? =-.

  • Kristi,

    Great post!

    I have dealt with all of the different kinds of spam comments you describe on my blog. I totally agree with what you said about how it is very hard deleting comments that are just saying "Good job" if your blog is relatively new and struggling for comments.

    I think encouraging comments at the end of your post and replying to people who take the time to leave an insightful comment are ways you will engage more of your readership.
    .-= Mark Thompson´s last blog ..Are Custom Web Designs Being Replaced By WordPress? =-.

  • Ritu says:

    Nice Article <———– avoid comments like these ;-)

  • Ritu says:

    Nice Article <———– avoid comments like these ;-)

  • David Leonhardt
    Twitter:
    says:

    It is funny how some people think they can write those ambiguous comments and think they’ll foll the blogger. I am sure that I have at some point deleted a legitimate comment because it was too ambiguous. But the thing is that even if it is ambiguous, it adds nothing to the conversation. And while I hate to delete a legitimate comment, I don’t feel too guilty about it is. “Hey, I never thought of that.” is the best they can contribute.

  • David Leonhardt
    Twitter:
    says:

    It is funny how some people think they can write those ambiguous comments and think they'll foll the blogger. I am sure that I have at some point deleted a legitimate comment because it was too ambiguous. But the thing is that even if it is ambiguous, it adds nothing to the conversation. And while I hate to delete a legitimate comment, I don't feel too guilty about it is. "Hey, I never thought of that." is the best they can contribute.

  • Gerri says:

    I’m always concerned that I’m deleting legitimate comments, but on most of them it’s pretty obvious – especially, like you said, when they are commenting on something that isn’t included in the post.
    .-= Gerri´s last blog ..absolutelytrue: Cloud computing not so green after all http://bit.ly/cRgyDT #greenit =-.

    • Kristi Hines
      Twitter:
      says:

      It's tough sometimes. I usually leave comments I'm uncertain about in the pending approval list. If it is someone that visits your site regularly, they will eventually contact you and ask why their comment wasn't added. Or you will see they have returned later on and made other good comments, and you will feel better about approving the first one.
      .-= Kristi Hines´s last blog ..Valuable Commenters vs. Comment Spammers =-.

  • Gerri says:

    I'm always concerned that I'm deleting legitimate comments, but on most of them it's pretty obvious – especially, like you said, when they are commenting on something that isn't included in the post.
    .-= Gerri´s last blog ..absolutelytrue: Cloud computing not so green after all http://bit.ly/cRgyDT #greenit =-.

    • Kristi Hines
      Twitter:
      says:

      It's tough sometimes. I usually leave comments I'm uncertain about in the pending approval list. If it is someone that visits your site regularly, they will eventually contact you and ask why their comment wasn't added. Or you will see they have returned later on and made other good comments, and you will feel better about approving the first one.
      .-= Kristi Hines´s last blog ..Valuable Commenters vs. Comment Spammers =-.

  • James Lee says:

    I know I fell for the ol’ “like what you’re doing here” comment spam when I first started up.

    One of the more clever spam posts I saw recently mixed a couple of phrases from the article with phrases from previous comments. The only problem: even assuming English was a third or fourth language, the sentence structure was so mangled that it couldn’t have been anything but a robot. Happy to delete that one…

    I run Akismet, so I like it when I get to “mark as spam,” knowing that I’m flagging that spammers pattern to help protect other bloggers.

    What annoys me more than anything is this: I run a blog with keyword luv enabled, and my comment policy is in big red letters above the comment box, and people still don’t include their name in their comments. Very frustrating…
    .-= James Lee´s last blog ..Stuffed Animals =-.

    • Kristi Hines
      Twitter:
      says:

      I honestly think there is a spinning software for comments, or someone is taking the time to copy / past earlier comments and trying to spin them. I had one that almost got by me, except I remember something similar had already been said. They just rearranged the order of the wording and replaced some synonyms. Seems like it would have taken just as much time to actually leave a valuable comment, unless they just didn't have any clue what the post was about in the first place.
      .-= Kristi Hines´s last blog ..Valuable Commenters vs. Comment Spammers =-.

  • James Lee says:

    I know I fell for the ol’ “like what you’re doing here” comment spam when I first started up.

    One of the more clever spam posts I saw recently mixed a couple of phrases from the article with phrases from previous comments. The only problem: even assuming English was a third or fourth language, the sentence structure was so mangled that it couldn’t have been anything but a robot. Happy to delete that one…

    I run Akismet, so I like it when I get to “mark as spam,” knowing that I’m flagging that spammers pattern to help protect other bloggers.

    What annoys me more than anything is this: I run a blog with keyword luv enabled, and my comment policy is in big red letters above the comment box, and people still don’t include their name in their comments. Very frustrating…
    .-= James Lee´s last blog ..Stuffed Animals =-.

    • Kristi Hines
      Twitter:
      says:

      I honestly think there is a spinning software for comments, or someone is taking the time to copy / past earlier comments and trying to spin them. I had one that almost got by me, except I remember something similar had already been said. They just rearranged the order of the wording and replaced some synonyms. Seems like it would have taken just as much time to actually leave a valuable comment, unless they just didn't have any clue what the post was about in the first place.
      .-= Kristi Hines´s last blog ..Valuable Commenters vs. Comment Spammers =-.

  • Ann Smarty
    Twitter:
    says:

    What a nice read. As the one who has been moderating about 100 comments daily, I can tell you this is tough. I think I am guilty of accidentally spammming a couple of valid comments because they started with something like "Wow, what a …"
    .-= Ann Smarty´s last blog ..Linking Makes the Web Go ‘Round =-.

  • Ann Smarty
    Twitter:
    says:

    What a nice read. As the one who has been moderating about 100 comments daily, I can tell you this is tough. I think I am guilty of accidentally spammming a couple of valid comments because they started with something like "Wow, what a …"
    .-= Ann Smarty´s last blog ..Linking Makes the Web Go ‘Round =-.

  • Ron Callari says:

    I personally screen all my comments and delete where and when appropriate. But my readers are also savvy enough to know the difference. If they don’t, they shouldn’t be reading my posts. Thanks for the tips included here.
    .-= Ron Callari´s last blog ..Become A Better Sleeper With The Zeo Personal Sleep Coach =-.

  • Ron Callari says:

    I personally screen all my comments and delete where and when appropriate. But my readers are also savvy enough to know the difference. If they don't, they shouldn't be reading my posts. Thanks for the tips included here.
    .-= Ron Callari´s last blog ..Become A Better Sleeper With The Zeo Personal Sleep Coach =-.

  • Carla says:

    Thanks for making me feel better! I thought, as a new blogger, that it was just me. I thought I was the only one having issues distinguishing real from bogus comments. It is so annoying when your spamming comments far out number your valid comments!

  • Carla says:

    Thanks for making me feel better! I thought, as a new blogger, that it was just me. I thought I was the only one having issues distinguishing real from bogus comments. It is so annoying when your spamming comments far out number your valid comments!

  • Tristan says:

    I have two blogs on Blogger. I have never done any sort of comment moderation and I think in my 3 years of blogging I have only received maybe 5 spam comments. They are pretty obvious but I admit I was flattered the first time until my husband pointed out it was spam. I guess I've been lucky so far but these were great tips to keep in mind in case it happens more frequently.
    .-= Tristan´s last blog ..Exercise in Futility =-.

    • Kristi Hines
      Twitter:
      says:

      That’s pretty impressive. I think it has to do with the fact that you do not allow people to use the Anonymous Name / URL when commenting – most spammers are commenting simply to get links back to their site, and if they can’t get those, there is not much motivation for them to do it. So that is a good way to keep yourself spam free on Blogger at least!
      .-= Kristi Hines´s last blog ..Valuable Commenters vs. Comment Spammers =-.

  • Tristan says:

    I have two blogs on Blogger. I have never done any sort of comment moderation and I think in my 3 years of blogging I have only received maybe 5 spam comments. They are pretty obvious but I admit I was flattered the first time until my husband pointed out it was spam. I guess I've been lucky so far but these were great tips to keep in mind in case it happens more frequently.
    .-= Tristan´s last blog ..Exercise in Futility =-.

    • Kristi Hines
      Twitter:
      says:

      That's pretty impressive. I think it has to do with the fact that you do not allow people to use the Anonymous Name / URL when commenting – most spammers are commenting simply to get links back to their site, and if they can't get those, there is not much motivation for them to do it. So that is a good way to keep yourself spam free on Blogger at least!
      .-= Kristi Hines´s last blog ..Valuable Commenters vs. Comment Spammers =-.

  • I am not much aggressive against the comments unless they have links on the message. Self promotion if it is related directly to the post content, I almost always approve. But if I find any comment with links that is no way related, I can’t resist clicking that ‘Spam’ link. I have already provided URI field and commentLuv link love, now what’s the use of entering yet another link in comment text that is not related from any way out?

    Another trend, I’ve noticed is leaving comments without any link and apparently legit comment, just to free themselves from already tagged ‘Spam’. These comments are very nice and almost nothing to disagree with; but posted in almost every blog they can access.

    Spam commenting has developed a new stream of knowledge?
    .-= Suresh Khanal´s last blog ..How to Redirect Old URL – Retain Link Juice and Ranking =-.

  • I am not much aggressive against the comments unless they have links on the message. Self promotion if it is related directly to the post content, I almost always approve. But if I find any comment with links that is no way related, I can't resist clicking that 'Spam' link. I have already provided URI field and commentLuv link love, now what's the use of entering yet another link in comment text that is not related from any way out?

    Another trend, I've noticed is leaving comments without any link and apparently legit comment, just to free themselves from already tagged 'Spam'. These comments are very nice and almost nothing to disagree with; but posted in almost every blog they can access.

    Spam commenting has developed a new stream of knowledge?
    .-= Suresh Khanal´s last blog ..How to Redirect Old URL – Retain Link Juice and Ranking =-.

  • This is a great post, I will surely come back. This has some good information. I will return.

  • This is a great post, I will surely come back. This has some good information. I will return.

  • Martyn says:

    I think one might have got through just above me!

    Regarding the post I totally agree and it can be one of the most fustrating things.

  • Martyn says:

    I think one might have got through just above me!

    Regarding the post I totally agree and it can be one of the most fustrating things.

  • Gautam Hans says:

    Frankly speaking, I agree with you, Gravatar is really very important. I as ablogger remember by commentators by their image and so images are great for remembering your frequent commentators.

    If i liked a post, i tell them why and just great posts pisses me off and so it does to a lot of bloggers out there.

    I think adding value to comment is not difficult if you try to add your experience in it or even your queries
    .-= Gautam Hans @ Blog Godown´s last blog ..How To Use Email Marketing To Draw More People To Your Website =-.

  • Gautam Hans says:

    Frankly speaking, I agree with you, Gravatar is really very important. I as ablogger remember by commentators by their image and so images are great for remembering your frequent commentators.

    If i liked a post, i tell them why and just great posts pisses me off and so it does to a lot of bloggers out there.

    I think adding value to comment is not difficult if you try to add your experience in it or even your queries
    .-= Gautam Hans @ Blog Godown´s last blog ..How To Use Email Marketing To Draw More People To Your Website =-.

  • Brian D. Hawkins
    Twitter:
    says:

    I found Google to be a nice tool when in doubt about generic comments like, “Wow, what a great post. This is my first time to visit here, and I like everything so much that I have subscribed.”

    I put them in quotes, and many times a search will bring up dozens of approved comments on other blogs that didn’t know any better.

    The spammers that take sentences from other comments got me a couple of times. They really are getting smarter, but so are we ;)

    Every now and then I like to change the spammer’s URL to something a little more fun, just to make a point. I have a dedicated URL that I set up just for them.
    .-= Brian D. Hawkins´s last blog ..Are You A Blogging Friend To The Extreme Ezine? Get On The List! =-.

    • Gerald Weber
      Twitter:
      says:

      Brian,

      You’re so right! I have done the Google thing a few times only to find the EXACT SAME generic comment plastered all over the internet.

      However these days I don’t even bother checking the ambiguous comments in Google. I simply delete them now. :-)

    • Kristi Hines
      Twitter:
      says:

      I never thought about changing the URL for spam comments… that’s a pretty good one. I see some sites that just delete it or selectively nofollow it (on dofollow blogs). I guess it’s a good way to give worthy sites some link juice!
      .-= Kristi Hines´s last blog ..Google PageRank Update – Internal Pages and Top Content Analysis =-.

      • LoneWolf says:

        What URL would you change it too? I doubt that the spammer would ever notice since they aren’t even visiting the blog in most cases (my blogs are low enough traffic that I see spam comments when Google Analytics shows no page views) — it’s robots baby!

        You’re probably better just to flag it as spam so Askimet gets a feel for it. Also, leaving spam comments in your blog may not look good to other visitors unless you explain what you’re doing.

        If you want to give some link juice to legitimate commenters then there are other ways to do that. You could have a monthly list of “Most Active Participants” and share some link juice that way.
        .-= LoneWolf´s last blog ..Internet Marketing Gone Wild =-.

  • Brian D. Hawkins
    Twitter:
    says:

    I found Google to be a nice tool when in doubt about generic comments like, “Wow, what a great post. This is my first time to visit here, and I like everything so much that I have subscribed.”

    I put them in quotes, and many times a search will bring up dozens of approved comments on other blogs that didn't know any better.

    The spammers that take sentences from other comments got me a couple of times. They really are getting smarter, but so are we ;)

    Every now and then I like to change the spammer's URL to something a little more fun, just to make a point. I have a dedicated URL that I set up just for them.
    .-= Brian D. Hawkins´s last blog ..Are You A Blogging Friend To The Extreme Ezine? Get On The List! =-.

    • Gerald Weber
      Twitter:
      says:

      Brian,

      You're so right! I have done the Google thing a few times only to find the EXACT SAME generic comment plastered all over the internet.

      However these days I don't even bother checking the ambiguous comments in Google. I simply delete them now. :-)

    • Kristi Hines
      Twitter:
      says:

      I never thought about changing the URL for spam comments… that's a pretty good one. I see some sites that just delete it or selectively nofollow it (on dofollow blogs). I guess it's a good way to give worthy sites some link juice!
      .-= Kristi Hines´s last blog ..Google PageRank Update – Internal Pages and Top Content Analysis =-.

      • LoneWolf says:

        What URL would you change it too? I doubt that the spammer would ever notice since they aren't even visiting the blog in most cases (my blogs are low enough traffic that I see spam comments when Google Analytics shows no page views) — it's robots baby!

        You're probably better just to flag it as spam so Askimet gets a feel for it. Also, leaving spam comments in your blog may not look good to other visitors unless you explain what you're doing.

        If you want to give some link juice to legitimate commenters then there are other ways to do that. You could have a monthly list of "Most Active Participants" and share some link juice that way.
        .-= LoneWolf´s last blog ..Internet Marketing Gone Wild =-.

  • Gerald Weber
    Twitter:
    says:

    Brian,

    Can you show us an example of the URL you use just for spammers? That sounds like fun.

  • Gerald Weber
    Twitter:
    says:

    Brian,

    Can you show us an example of the URL you use just for spammers? That sounds like fun.

  • Krasnal says:

    You are very right in what you are writing.
    But what about just boring comments?
    .-= Krasnal´s last blog ..Getting your look right on the first date =-.

  • Krasnal says:

    You are very right in what you are writing.
    But what about just boring comments?
    .-= Krasnal´s last blog ..Getting your look right on the first date =-.

  • I have some niche blogs I write in under pen names and I find it a creative writing challange to find blogs in those niches, write as that person, and leave comments that are good enough to get approved. On these niche blogs, unless something is purely spam I approve it too, even if it is “promotional” as long as it’s kind of relevant.
    .-= Warner Carter´s last blog ..New SEO Tool – How Much Money Are You Leaving On The Table With Your SEO =-.

  • I have some niche blogs I write in under pen names and I find it a creative writing challange to find blogs in those niches, write as that person, and leave comments that are good enough to get approved. On these niche blogs, unless something is purely spam I approve it too, even if it is “promotional” as long as it’s kind of relevant.
    .-= Warner Carter´s last blog ..New SEO Tool – How Much Money Are You Leaving On The Table With Your SEO =-.

  • Richard says:

    When I receive comments that look real but have some suspicious element, I copy the comment and paste it into Google. And wouldn’t you know…that same comment can be found on 100′s of blogs. Do you where it then goes? Straight to the spam queue!
    .-= Richard´s last blog ..How Do I Save YouTube Videos On My Computer =-.

  • Richard says:

    When I receive comments that look real but have some suspicious element, I copy the comment and paste it into Google. And wouldn't you know…that same comment can be found on 100's of blogs. Do you where it then goes? Straight to the spam queue!
    .-= Richard´s last blog ..How Do I Save YouTube Videos On My Computer =-.

  • Scott "Social Media" Allen says:

    Akismet is notorious for false positives, though. I’ve long been an advocate of the very same commenting best practices you suggest above, and a vocal opponent of shilling. A couple of years ago, though, I pissed off a spammer/shiller who then joe jobbed me. It took weeks of effort to try to clean up the mess, and

    I thought I had finally straightened it out with Akismet, but lately, it seems Akismet hates me and is flagging my comments as spam again. I have no idea why. I’ve tried contacting them but haven’t heard back.

    I suppose it will eventually fix itself, but in the meantime, it’s a serious pain in the ass having to contact every new blog I comment on and ask them to retrieve my comments from spam limbo/hell (as I’ll undoubtedly have to do on this one).
    .-= Scott “Social Media” Allen´s last blog ..Think You Can Catch Up on Sleep? Think Again! =-.

  • Scott "Social Media" Allen says:

    Akismet is notorious for false positives, though. I’ve long been an advocate of the very same commenting best practices you suggest above, and a vocal opponent of shilling. A couple of years ago, though, I pissed off a spammer/shiller who then joe jobbed me. It took weeks of effort to try to clean up the mess, and

    I thought I had finally straightened it out with Akismet, but lately, it seems Akismet hates me and is flagging my comments as spam again. I have no idea why. I’ve tried contacting them but haven’t heard back.

    I suppose it will eventually fix itself, but in the meantime, it’s a serious pain in the ass having to contact every new blog I comment on and ask them to retrieve my comments from spam limbo/hell (as I’ll undoubtedly have to do on this one).
    .-= Scott “Social Media” Allen´s last blog ..Think You Can Catch Up on Sleep? Think Again! =-.

  • francesca says:

    Thank you for the great post, it was something I tried to figure out before – and I, too, thought I was the only one getting all that spammy comments.

    @LoneWolf – I had to check your blog since you mentioned a few times not having a lot of traffic/comments (hey was that a tactic to get visitors?! ;D just kidding) and I can’t understand why since the blog I saw is very interesting! I’ll be visiting regularly and maybe comment, too :>

    ps: I will get a gravatar, I never thought it would make such a difference :)

  • francesca says:

    Thank you for the great post, it was something I tried to figure out before – and I, too, thought I was the only one getting all that spammy comments.

    @LoneWolf – I had to check your blog since you mentioned a few times not having a lot of traffic/comments (hey was that a tactic to get visitors?! ;D just kidding) and I can't understand why since the blog I saw is very interesting! I'll be visiting regularly and maybe comment, too :>

    ps: I will get a gravatar, I never thought it would make such a difference :)

  • wickless candles says:

    like this, posting as a first person. sounds real

  • GIT says:

    thanks for sharing, very usefull.

  • I had some idea on blog commenting and now sem-group has given me some more useful information on blog commenting……. thanks a lot..

  • David says:

    Thanks for a great post. I agree, it is very annoying to be attacked with spammers and it’s good that there are systems that remove them. Still, I think only with practice and as time passes, new bloggers will realize who spams and who talks to the point, just like everything in life, it comes with experience.
    Good Luck all and again thank you for a great and positive post.

  • I manage over 60 websites/ blogs using WordPress with Akismet (which helps a lot). I have to say, the most common type of faux pas comments I get are the bot-generated, ambiguous, flattering kind. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve received a comment like “this is the greatest blog on the web” for the ‘ol “Hello World” test post…lol.

  • Nice post really helpful for many people, I was looking for this information for a long time please keep writing articles like this.

  • David says:

    Some great tips. Luckily my site is run off WordPress so Akismet picks up most of the dodgy stuff. It’s amazing the length some of these spammers seem to go through to get past the gates though, there are surely easier ways of building links!