Little Things Bloggers Crave And Most Never Get

Aug 5, 2010   //   by Andrew Rondeau   //   blogging, SEO Blog  //  79 Comments

This is a guest post from Andrew Rondeau. It is part of The “Bad Ass” SEO Guest Blogging Contest.

There is a huge amount of blogging advice available to all of us if we are willing to search and put the effort into finding it but…

…When it comes to blogging, have you ever had the feeling that you are completely out of your depth?

Sometimes, running a blog can feel like swimming for the first time.

You start out all enthusiastic and then just as you think you’ve nailed the first few strokes, you start to sink.

Getting set up with WordPress and taking the plunge to write your first blog post is exhilarating. You get to pick your theme, your images  and you launch your very own voice out in the big wide world.

If you’re lucky you may even attract some comments.

You are on a roll (blog roll?!) and you are fired up with enthusiasm.

Then you have to do it again and again and again.

After a few weeks, the beauty of it fades.

You may have packed in your ‘real’ job and made the jump to full time blogging. The money isn’t coming in.

You are getting nagged by your spouse who doesn’t understand how much time you are putting in to your new business venture, and why you aren’t seeing immediate results.

You wake up early every day and spend up to twelve hours at your desk hammering away, developing your free product and writing posts, commenting on other blogs and joining forums.

You don’t know which way to turn.

You do some research to try and sort things out.

You find yourself wading through a myriad different offers.

Link optimization.

Keyword analysis.

Blog design.

SEO.

Plugins.

Getting Traffic.

List building.

Article writing.

Social Bookmarking.

Selling, relationship building, affiliates, joint ventures, squeeze pages, add-ons, widgets, backups, security, copywriting, gadgets, hard drives, online storage, software, hardware, shareware, malware, outsourcing, making videos, creating products, membership sites…

It’s tough, isn’t it?

You begin to wonder why you got in to this whole business of working for yourself.

People aren’t reading your blog. You haven’t made any money yet.

You’re tired.

Someone offers you the chance to go and visit them abroad, and you turn them down because you’re scared of leaving your new business venture for just a moment, in case the dream opportunity comes along and your services are finally acknowledged as the superb thing they are.

You’re fed up.

You’re working longer hours than you ever did when someone employed you.

You sleep less, because all the stress of what you are going through plays itself over and over in your mind, you get stomach upsets because you can’t chill out, and every minute you spend away from your business feels wasted, as if you are messing about relaxing instead of making your job work.

Those around you can’t understand your situation, they think that working for yourself should be easy, you’ve got what you always wanted, right?

You should be able to choose what you do, when. You should be sitting back and relaxing, watching the money pour in, because you are now your own boss and everything has changed.

Right? Riiiight!

You and I both know that this isn’t the case. You wonder what the answer is.

How do you reach the dream?

The one involving sun-loungers, lay-ins, leisurely checking of emails?

Is there a solution?

Is it better to go back to paid work for a company, or stick with your blogging business?

I believe there is a solution but it takes several months of hard work, determination AND following a plan of action that is proven to work:

1. Get your head right. Tell yourself this is going to take a few months of hard work as there is no ‘silver bullet’ to making money on-line but your hard work will be rewarded.

And you can only do a certain number of activities at one time – you can’t do it all!

2. Research. Spent time researching to choose a niche that sells on-line and perform some keyword research to ensure people are searching to overcome problems in the niche.

3. Set up your WordPress blog. Get the domain, install wordpress, optimize it for SEO, add all the ‘must- have’ plugins required and improve the security of your blog.

4. Blog design. Get a theme and design your blog with your customer in mind.

5. Learn how to write brilliant blog posts (for SEO and your customers) and publish them for maximum Google Luv!

6. Create a free product and start building your own customer list.

7. Drive traffic via commenting, back-linking, blog carnivals, guest posting, social bookmarking, article marketing

8. Start to build relationships with your customers.

9. Get into affiliate marketing.

10. Start creating and selling your own products.

11. Outsource.

You want to create daily, weekly and month plans of the tasks you want to complete. You will feel less overwhelmed and in control if you can see what you want to accomplish today, this week.

You aim is to make progress in your on-line business every day. Whether that’s by writing an incredible blog post or driving more traffic or developing your product.

What’s your plan for today, this week, this month?

Similar Posts:

Andrew Rondeau

Andrew Rondeau is the author of the free guide "The Income Blogging Blueprint". You can grab your complimentary copy of his blogging guide at http://www.webuildyourblog.com today. You can also connect with Andrew on Twitter

More Posts - Website

"Newsletter" Our weekly newsletter features some of the best curated SEO content from around the web!



Comment Policy

  • This is a superb article. It can be overwhelming knowing how best to approach all the things we need to be doing as small business owners, to keep our blogs running at optimum. Thank you for the wise advice!

    Jen

  • This is a superb article. It can be overwhelming knowing how best to approach all the things we need to be doing as small business owners, to keep our blogs running at optimum. Thank you for the wise advice!

    Jen

  • Gerald Weber
    Twitter:
    says:

    Andrew,

    Thanks for taking the time to write this one up.

    I'm not exactly a professional blogger per se, but I am an entrepreneur.

    I can tell you this. My first 2 years in business I ate a lot of Ramen noodles and macaroni & cheese. lmao.

    So I can totally relate to what you're saying in this post.

    Right when you think it's about time to throw in the towel is the time that is most important to stick with it.

    Have a business plan and have goals. Most importantly never give up.

  • Gerald Weber
    Twitter:
    says:

    Andrew,

    Thanks for taking the time to write this one up.

    I’m not exactly a professional blogger per se, but I am an entrepreneur.

    I can tell you this. My first 2 years in business I ate a lot of Ramen noodles and macaroni & cheese. lmao.

    So I can totally relate to what you’re saying in this post.

    Right when you think it’s about time to throw in the towel is the time that is most important to stick with it.

    Have a business plan and have goals. Most importantly never give up.

  • Gerri says:

    Running a site is hard work that not everyone is cut out for, honestly.

  • Gerri says:

    Running a site is hard work that not everyone is cut out for, honestly.

  • This post is dead on! Great tips indeed!

  • This post is dead on! Great tips indeed!

  • David Leonhardt
    Twitter:
    says:

    When you run your own business there is nobody to tell you what to do. And nobody to give you a vacation. Sorry, but you have chosen to forgo that month-long trek through the Himalayas.

  • David Leonhardt
    Twitter:
    says:

    When you run your own business there is nobody to tell you what to do. And nobody to give you a vacation. Sorry, but you have chosen to forgo that month-long trek through the Himalayas.

  • Andrew says:

    Jen,

    Thanks for your nice words.

    What about plans for your blog? Are there any steps that you are taking to make it bigger / better?

    Andrew

  • Andrew says:

    Jen,

    Thanks for your nice words.

    What about plans for your blog? Are there any steps that you are taking to make it bigger / better?

    Andrew

  • Andrew says:

    Gerald,

    …and if things aren't turning out as expected…get some advice or change your approach. That's what a great entrepreneur would do, right?

    Must admit I took the less risky approach…I started my on-line business whilst still working full-time.

    I worked evenings and weekends until it was providing enough money for me to leave the 9 – 5, which I did 18 months ago.

    Andrew

  • Andrew says:

    Gerald,

    …and if things aren’t turning out as expected…get some advice or change your approach. That’s what a great entrepreneur would do, right?

    Must admit I took the less risky approach…I started my on-line business whilst still working full-time.

    I worked evenings and weekends until it was providing enough money for me to leave the 9 – 5, which I did 18 months ago.

    Andrew

  • Andrew says:

    Gerri,

    That is very true. It's a shame so many people THINK it's easy to make money on-line. Unfortunately they believe some of the hyped up sales pages.

    Are you cut out for it?

    Andrew

  • Andrew says:

    Gerri,

    That is very true. It’s a shame so many people THINK it’s easy to make money on-line. Unfortunately they believe some of the hyped up sales pages.

    Are you cut out for it?

    Andrew

  • Andrew says:

    Thanks Scott!

    Any tip that jumps out as being the best one, for you?

    Andrew

  • Andrew says:

    Thanks Scott!

    Any tip that jumps out as being the best one, for you?

    Andrew

  • Andrew says:

    David,

    Re: Vacation? What's that?

    Seriously, you are right…unless you plan it and work hard for the x number of months beforehand…plus outsource any maintenance while you are away.

    Andrew

  • Andrew says:

    David,

    Re: Vacation? What’s that?

    Seriously, you are right…unless you plan it and work hard for the x number of months beforehand…plus outsource any maintenance while you are away.

    Andrew

  • Andrew,

    Great post! As a beginning blogger, it is encouraging to know that even the most successful bloggers have gone through this cycle.

    Sometimes it is hard to imagine I can create anything that hasn't already been written about!

    Thanks for sharing your experiences with us.

  • Andrew,
    Great post! As a beginning blogger, it is encouraging to know that even the most successful bloggers have gone through this cycle.

    Sometimes it is hard to imagine I can create anything that hasn’t already been written about!

    Thanks for sharing your experiences with us.

  • A great step-by-step Andrew! I think a lot of people see blogging as a quick fix, but it is just like any other business – it takes time and effort before you start seeing results. But most people don't see the results, because they don't stick around long enough.

  • A great step-by-step Andrew! I think a lot of people see blogging as a quick fix, but it is just like any other business – it takes time and effort before you start seeing results. But most people don’t see the results, because they don’t stick around long enough.

  • David Leonhardt
    Twitter:
    says:

    Blogging a quick fix? Constantly creating witty, unique, never-before-written content in the age of information overload? That's funny. :-)

  • David Leonhardt
    Twitter:
    says:

    Blogging a quick fix? Constantly creating witty, unique, never-before-written content in the age of information overload? That’s funny. :-)

  • Andrew says:

    Sabine,

    I would guess 99% of what we write has already been written by someone else…somewhere.

    You have to write in your own style though.

    Perhaps share a story or your experiences or try a video or podcast.

    One of the key skills of a blogger that not many talk about is…imagination / creativity.

    We have to constantly think of new ways to share our knowledge.

    How could you be different?

    Andrew

  • Andrew says:

    Sabine,

    I would guess 99% of what we write has already been written by someone else…somewhere.

    You have to write in your own style though.

    Perhaps share a story or your experiences or try a video or podcast.

    One of the key skills of a blogger that not many talk about is…imagination / creativity.

    We have to constantly think of new ways to share our knowledge.

    How could you be different?

    Andrew

  • Andrew says:

    Thomas

    Thanks for coming across and helping me out…by adding a comment.

    You are right – too many believe the hype of quick income.. try it for a few weeks…earn nothing…give up…

    …then tell their friends, "the internet doesn't work".

    As you say, it's a business and businesses take time to grow and prosper.

    Andrew

  • Andrew says:

    Thomas

    Thanks for coming across and helping me out…by adding a comment.

    You are right – too many believe the hype of quick income.. try it for a few weeks…earn nothing…give up…

    …then tell their friends, “the internet doesn’t work”.

    As you say, it’s a business and businesses take time to grow and prosper.

    Andrew

  • Hey Andrew,

    Super-awesome post man. Very well written.

    I think building relationship plays important role in blogging ;).

    Thanks for sharing this awesome post. Keep up the good work man.

    ~Dev

  • Hey Andrew,

    Super-awesome post man. Very well written.
    I think building relationship plays important role in blogging ;).

    Thanks for sharing this awesome post. Keep up the good work man.

    ~Dev

  • Corinne Edwards says:

    Dear Andrew -

    I would skip any offer that guarantees to make you millions in a short time. Just send $2000.

    The old adage that if it seems to be too good to be true it is.

    There are plenty of used car salesmen on line. Make sure you trust the source.

    It takes time to build an audience. And to start making money.

    Nobody tells you that in the beginning.

  • Corinne Edwards says:

    Dear Andrew -

    I would skip any offer that guarantees to make you millions in a short time. Just send $2000.

    The old adage that if it seems to be too good to be true it is.

    There are plenty of used car salesmen on line. Make sure you trust the source.

    It takes time to build an audience. And to start making money.

    Nobody tells you that in the beginning.

  • Rick Byrd says:

    Andrew:

    This is an awesome post.

    In the past, I have had that sinking feeling of not knowing what to do next or whihc way to turn while trying to build my online business.

    Your plan of action is right on.

    My current focus is on listbuilding. I am new to Internet Marketing so my list is very small. I am contributing to several JV giveaway events. I need to participate in some adswaps with other marketers.

    Thanks,

    - Rick

  • Rick Byrd says:

    Andrew:

    This is an awesome post.

    In the past, I have had that sinking feeling of not knowing what to do next or whihc way to turn while trying to build my online business.

    Your plan of action is right on.

    My current focus is on listbuilding. I am new to Internet Marketing so my list is very small. I am contributing to several JV giveaway events. I need to participate in some adswaps with other marketers.

    Thanks,

    - Rick

  • Luqman says:

    Thanks for this informative post, it is a nice post and very educative as well.

  • Luqman says:

    Thanks for this informative post, it is a nice post and very educative as well.

  • Thelondoneer says:

    In my case Andrew it's taken *years* of effort to make money, basically because I didn't get it when I started out – and frankly you have to start thinking like a business person to make money from blogging, which frankly doesn't come naturally to most of us as we're using it as a creative outlet – the other side of the brain doesn't get a look in.

    I've finally begun to understand now, and I've made some decent additional income in the last two months (far more than I would have got through CPC or CPM) by doing some sponsored posts after being approached directly (by organisations I would have happily mentioned for free to be honest – but then that's been half of the problem…)

    I think it's a good idea that anyone who is blogging for fun spends a little time thinking about how they might monetise without cheapening themselves – once you've been blogging for a few years and are still not making any money you're quite likely to chuck it in because you start feeling resentful. That's where I was a few months ago…

  • Gerlaine Talk says:

    I know how overwhelming blogging can be. I went back to work after quitting a job to go blogging. I have an entirely new blog from the one that I started out with an an entirely new theme.

    I finally have created my free product to start building my list and I am downright excited! yes!

    I'm not too concerned about making money from it immediately anymore, because I have an income. I'm working on creating a community of people who trust me and are ready to open their pocketbooks at any moment, because I am providing true value. Yes!

  • Dev,

    You are right – realtionships are key. No relationships = no success.

    Andrew

  • Corinne

    …And at the start of my on-line business, I believed the hype. You are right, no one told me it was going to take 3 years before it was successful.

    I've taken a different approach for my blogging course. I actually tell customers it will take you a long time and lots of hard work to make money on-line. I THINK people like that open approach.

    Andrew

  • Hi Rick,

    The list building approach was one real good piece of advice I was given on day one of my on-line business.

    My list has been growing ever since.

    I hope you don't mind me saying…be careful on the ad swaps. I've come across a few that are so hyped up that I would never do the swap.

    If you feel the ad is not right for your list don't swap.

    Andrew

  • It's great to hear you are turning the corner…to better things and income!

    As in any business, it is a matter of trial and error. Some things work for you and not me and vice versa.

    When it comes to blogging and making money there are no rules…just guidelines and some work and some don't. It depends on your niche…your audience…your writing…your design…

    Thanks for being open and sharing some of your story.

    Andrew

  • Lavenderuses says:

    Spot on Andrew. I relate to all the first part but also believe with persistence and the passion I have for my chosen niche; in time I will be successful. I love blogging and especially writing articles. As you know, the techie stuff is my challenge!
    Great article and I'm now off to Tweet this to my readers. I love Twitter too as meeting some great ppl along the way.
    Patricia Perth Australia

  • Thanks, Patrcia – you are not alone when you say, "I relate to all the first part" – I think many do.

    Andrew

  • I sure can relate to this. You talk about swimming, maybe that is it I need to learn to swim, since I never did. Ok I am going to do what you say and start swimming up stream. Thanks Andrew.

    Debbie

  • Blogging is fun and full of surprises! I love meeting new people online and reading about their lives. It is hard work though and not for the faint of heart.

  • Your "first easy, then difficult" description of blogging hits the nail on the head squarely. In this way it's like hiking in the mountains … the mountain sure looks a walk in the park from a distance, but not as we get closer … and in the end we risk to be defeated not by the mountain, but by the pebble in our shoe. We realize it's not about the mountain. Instead it's about who we become in the process of making it to the top of the mountain.
    - Beat

  • Anonymous says:

    Grim desperate story here – and mostly true. Except I did not expect to make money for quite a while so that part was OK.

    My problem at first is that I was writing posts that were 3000 words. Nobody, unless it is your sister, will read that unless it is a gripping story. And I was trying to post too often to keep up that pressure. It was exhausting. It was WORK. And I had three readers – one my sister. I was discouraged.

    A blogger I had never heard of sent me an email to tell me to stay under 1000 words max and more people would read if I stayed between 500 – 750 words.

    That's when I took heart and started all over again.

    Now, I mostly do it to keep me off the street. It is too cold in the winter and too hot in the summer in Chicago. It is my company. And it has become fun because I have made friends from all over.

    Thank God I didn't need to make money although it would have been nice.

    Some is coming in now but it has been three years.

    Unless you get very lucky the worst mistake a blogger can make is to expect to support themselves for quite a while.

  • Michelle says:

    Geez I was laughing so hard … .. I've been there! Thanks Andrew

  • Michelle,

    I think many of us have but only a few would admit it!

    Andrew

  • Corinne

    I think you are right when you say…

    "the worst mistake a blogger can make is to expect to support themselves for quite a while".

    Unfortunately, there are still a lot of hyped up sales letters that tell you, you will make $thousands overnight. And many still sell.

    In the world today, so many are looking for a free easy buck to make and think blogging is the way out.

    It can be…but not after hard work and time.

    Andrew

  • Beat,

    That pebble is the distraction, isn't it? But rather that taking off your boot and throwing the pebble away…you carry on…"it's not so bad". Until you can hardly walk…give up…never to return.

    Andrew

  • Cheryl,

    True – it can be fun and definitely full of surprizes.

    The meeting of new people is the big, big bonus, isn't it?

    I certainly have more on-line friends that off-line!

    What does that say about me?

    Andrew

  • Debbie,

    Just make sure you have a daily plan!!!!

    Andrew

  • tyroneshum says:

    Hi Andrew,

    I agree. Blogging wouldn't be too easy nor too hard but it's all about having a set program in mind for you to do one thing at a time and then yield results bit by bit. I know I've had both ups and downs with blogging in the past but when I started to rinse what I've been doing and then choose better tools to optimize my system, all comes easy in place. Outsourcing as well has even made it much hands-off up to this day! :)

  • Bill says:

    Wow, really great post. I was like that at the beginning, but I was 100% sure that I CAN make money online. I just had to figure out MY way for doing that. I am still not giving up, and money are finally starting to come ;)
    Cheers.

  • I think a lot of people are held back because they want to learn and do everything themselves…rather than outsource.

    My view is if there is someone out there who is more knowledgeable, quicker and affordable…then outsource it.

    Andrew

  • Bill,

    Great news…you persevered and now the benefits are coming in.

    Andrew

  • Great post, and how very true. It's interesting reading the backgrounds of lots of people who have been successful blogging or selling products online that they did it while working full or part time as well, in order to support themselves during the early years.
    Very rare is the real overnight success. Just because someone becomes successful overnight doesn't mean it didn't take years to get into the position to become successful.

  • Kathy says:

    You can tell that you have been doing this for a while. It appears that you have it pretty much figured out. Now the question becomes, "Will you do as you know you are supposed to?"

    A lot of bloggers know the things they need to do. Yet, many of them fail to even start doing them. It is very easy to procrastinate at this.

  • Clara says:

    No. 11 is important. You can't do everything and will get overwhelmed if you try.

  • Affiliate Management says:

    This so well written and I'm so there – no sleep and all. It;s 12:30 am and I'm leaving comments on blogs :-(

    Krizia | Affiliate Management Maven

  • Clara,

    You are right – like I said to Tyronne – I am surprized by how many people try and do everything themselves.

    Andrew

  • Kathy,

    Great question.

    Would you believe me if I said I don’t have time to procrastinate?

    I'm blogging, marketing, creating new products, run a blogging membership course (i.e. forums and teleconferences), have my own private clients, planning…

    But you are right – some of my clients come to me for mentoring and advice on what to do and that’s fine – we all need our hands held sometimes.

    Andrew

  • Joel

    So true! You only hear the good times. They often don't tell you how many years it took them to get there.

    Andrew

  • Michelle says:

    I get offers to make $60.00 in the next 60 minutes, Sign up now for this great affiliate course and make 50,00 in the next 6 months.. … but you are on the mark.. stay the course.. stay the course and ….follow your passions.

  • Anonymous says:

    Wow, Andrew! This article is the truth. It takes time, and you have to work on it every day for months before you start seeing substantial financial results. Then you have to keep working to expand those results. But working endlessly doesn't do anyone any good. It just wears you out.

    Great advice and spot-on analysis of what people "misunderestimate" blogging to be.

  • Thanks, Sherri.

    Blogging is hard work and that's why whatever your blog topic is – it has to be a true, genuine passion…otherwise it will be a hard slog.

    I know…I’ve tried blogging in a couple of niches that I knew nothing about thinking it would / could generate some income…it didn't and I got bored very quickly.

    Andrew

  • Amy LeForge says:

    Andrew, you've again done a fantastic job of making things so straightforward! This is a great resource for encouragement when a new blogger starts to flail.

  • This is an excellent list.

    It's also very helpful to be reminded that you can't do everything at once.

    Thanks, Andrew.

  • pkenjora says:

    Andrew,

    I felt exactly this way when I first started blogging. So I asked what if there was a social network for bloggers? Would that help?

    There wasn't one so I built it after raising some capital and building a team we have: http://www.arkayne.com/products/profiles/

    Anyway we're looking for feedback and case studies, since you're passionate about this topic reach out to me I'd love to talk.

    Thanks!

  • Ana
    Twitter:
    says:

    You are definitely dead on as far as how most bloggers feel in the beginning of their blogging career, Andrew. People come to me with these questions on a daily basis.

    Now I know where to send them for answers.

    Excellent post.

    Ana Hoffman
    PS This humongous list of blog traffic generating tips might help as well:
    Blog Traffic Tips

  • Thanks Amy – I appreciate your words.

    Andrew