Why Are People Following You on Twitter

Dec 2, 2011   //   by Kristi Hines   //   Social Media  //  2 Comments

In a post by Christina Reed entitled Thoughts of a Concerned Tweeter over on Smart Boy Designs, the author raised the point of “Why aren’t more people on Twitter asking the question, ‘what made you follow me?’ This is crucial information.”

This led me to remember some steps I had seen on how to find out the answer to this question by analyzing Twitter lists you have been added to using Excel and Wordle by both Rick Galan and Ari Herzog.

The following are updated directions for creating a Wordle using Excel 2010 and Open Office Calc 3.3.

Copying Your Twitter Lists

Twitter Lists Listed Count

  1. Go to your Twitter profile and click on the number Listed to see the Twitter lists in which people have added you.
  2. Keep scrolling to the bottom until you can either get them all to display. This might take awhile if you’re on a lot of lists, and you might run into a message that “loading seems to be taking awhile” – when you click Try Again, it will start loading more lists. When you reach the end, you’ll see a Back to Top link.
  3. Once you have all of your lists loaded, highlight them all and copy.

Highlighted Twitter Lists

Compiling Your Twitter Lists in Microsoft Office Excel 2010

Twitter Lists Pasted in Excel

  1. Create a new Excel document.
  2. Go to Paste > Paste Special > Text to paste the information without any formatting, pictures, etc.
  3. Go to the Data tab > Text to Columns. In the Convert to Text Columns Wizard, choose Delimited as the file type then click Next. Check Other under Delimiters and enter a / in the box then click Next. Then on the next screen, check Finish.
  4. Delete Column A.
  5. Delete Columns B through E.
  6. Scroll through and make sure there is at least 1 – 2 blank rows between each list name. Sometimes people will include a / in their list description and anything after that will still be in the spreadsheet – just delete those when you come across them (I had about 15 out of 2,000+ lists).
  7. Save your spreadsheet.
  8. Scroll down to the last item in Column A and highlight everything in Column A from the first row to the last. Press F5 and in the Go To screen, click the Special button. Under Select, choose Blanks and click Ok. Once the blanks are highlighted, go to the Home tab > Delete > Delete Cells and Shift Cells Up.
  9. Now you should have approximately the same number of rows as you do Twitter lists (I ended up with 2,035 rows for my 2,071 lists).
  10. Use the Find & Replace option to replace dashes (-) with a blank space ( ). This will take the Twitter default of adding dashes between words out to make a better keyword phrase (social media instead of social-media).

Twitter Lists Edited in Excel

Compiling Your Twitter Lists in Open Office Calc 3.3

  1. Create a new Calc document.
  2. Go to Paste Special > Unformatted Text.
  3. In the Text Import screen under Separator Options > Separated By, check Other, enter a / in the box, and click Ok.
  4. Delete Column A.
  5. Delete Columns B through E.
  6. Scroll through and make sure there is at least 1 – 2 blank rows between each list name. Sometimes people will include a / in their list description and anything after that will still be in the spreadsheet – just delete those when you come across them (I had about 15 out of 1,900+ lists).
  7. Save your spreadsheet.
  8. Scroll down to the last item in Column A and highlight everything in Column A from the first row to the last. Under the Data menu, select Sort > and then Sort by the first item in Column A and Ascending then click Ok.
  9. Now you should have approximately the same number of rows as you do Twitter lists.
  10. Use the Find & Replace option to replace dashes (-) with a blank space ( ). This will take the Twitter default of adding dashes between words out to make a better keyword phrase (social media instead of social-media).

Creating Your Wordle

Creating a Wordle

  1. Copy all of your keywords into the Wordle.net “Paste in a bunch of text” box and click Go.
  2. Allow Java to run if your browser gives you the prompt.
  3. Under Layout, change the Maximum Words to 50 and use the Mostly Horizontal layout.
  4. Under Color, change the color palette to something easy to read (I’m a fan of Shooting Star).
  5. under Font, change the font to something easy to read (I’m a fan of Coolvetica).
  6. From here, you will need to take a screenshot of your Wordle, then edit that screenshot to just show the actual Wordle. I use the free version of Jing (Mac or Windows), but you can use whatever method you normally do to take screenshots and size them appropriately. You can also zoom in using your browser to get a bigger shot than the default displayed size at 100%.

Why People Follow @kikolani

Here’s the Wordle result from my Twitter lists! Click on it to see the full size.

Wordle Results for Twitter Lists

Now I can see that people add me to their Twitter lists for blogging, social media, marketing, SEO, business, tech, experts, writers, influencers, and friends.

Once you’ve created your Wordle, you can use it in any way you please – on your blog, business cards, t-shirts, etc. as per Wordle’s terms of use for images produced by their applet.

Have you tried this out? What were your top keywords in Twitter lists? Be sure to share in the comments!

Similar Posts:

Kristi Hines

Kristi Hines is a freelance writer, professional blogger, and social media enthusiast. Don't miss her Web Domination Review on Kikolani. Follow her on Twitter and Google+!

More Posts - Website

"Newsletter" Our weekly newsletter features some of the best curated SEO content from around the web!



Comment Policy

  • Jamy Hoster
    Twitter:
    says:

    Well if I talk about my self then I must say that people like me as I always discuss with my stuff.

  • [...] some time on your hands and have a love of spreadsheets, you can use the directions in this post on creating a word collage of your Twitter lists. If not, just scroll down the Twitter lists following you and you’ll probably notice some [...]