Sometimes getting a fresh start is all a company needs to bounce back from a slump. In most cases, this fresh start begins with a new layout and a redesign of most webpages in order to improve the look and navigation capabilities for users and Google bots. This helps give the site a new feel and in some ways a chance at a new and better purpose. But what happens when the site is already successful? What happens when people feel comfortable with the layout? To cut to the chase—what happens if your website is LinkedIn?

Although a redesign has been in the works for quite some time, many were still surprised to hear that LinkedIn confirmed last week that they are going to be changing their layout. Fortunately, LinkedIn made it clear that the site will remain professional; it will simply be more intuitive for users.

New LinkedIn Features

According to the LinkedIn blog, both the LinkedIn Today as well as the traditional LinkedIn webpages will change. The new design is said to be easier for someone to scan and get the information he/she needs. Under the “modern design” umbrella come a few changes:

  • Relevancy – LinkedIn will now make sure that any updates or articles that are particularly relevant to you will show up at the top of your feed. LinkedIn will decide if content is relevant to you based on the connections you have, the information you are sharing, and any breaking or trending news in your industry.
  • Stream – LinkedIn will now have a stream very similar to the one you find on Facebook. You will be able to easily like or comment on a status update or an article right there on the homepage.

It is no secret that many social networks have changed their layouts in the past. Some layouts are successful—such as the Facebook timeline layout—but other layouts, like the new Digg layout, turned out to be a bad move for the networks. Only time will tell whether or not this new layout will turn people off or turn people on.

What This Means for Businesses

The new layout will no doubt be something for users to get used to, but businesses may also need to change their LinkedIn strategy. The new layout will put a much heavier emphasis on content. The old layout seemed to put a focus on the individual and the content the individual adds to his/her personal account, but the new layout will put a focus on articles put out by companies. People know how to find and how to understand the information on a personal account; LinkedIn no longer needs to make this the focal point. The idea is that LinkedIn will become a tool for education and news as well as a place to look at resumes.

Businesses should realize that now is the best time to be sharing content on LinkedIn. If your company wrote a great article that falls under the recruitment or employment sphere, you will (in theory) get more traction from this social network.

Are you excited about the new LinkedIn layout? Do you think it is wise for LinkedIn to make these changes, or do you think monthly activity will decrease? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below!

Photo Credit: blog.linkedin.com